Why is Bone Broth So Good for You?

written by Jessica Tilley

chicken soup, bon broth, soup

written byJessica Tilley

March 13th is National Chicken Noodle Soup Day and with the weather that we’ve been experiencing lately in Toronto, it couldn’t of come at a better time.  These days bone broth has become increasingly popular.  Although bone broth may sound intimidating, it's actually not all that different from making chicken soup (except that it is cooked for longer).

There’s something about curling up with a hot bowl of chicken noodle soup (or bone broth makes us quite happy too) that we love here at The Living Kitchen. Even though chicken soup is great to have at any time, most of us associate it with being sick. Although chicken soup isn’t going to cure you from the flu, it can help relieve the unbearable symptoms. There have been studies conducted that show that this broth has beneficial properties when trying to fend off the flu.

Similar to hot tea, hot soup helps to sooth a sore throat and the heat helps to clear congestion. Protein from the chicken provides a specific amino acid, cysteine, which also aids in the break down of mucus. The vegetables used in cooking the broth provide many vitamins and minerals.

Now normally chicken noodle soup is made with vegetable broth or chicken stock, but one way to increase the nutrients in a dish like this is to swap the broth or chicken stock for bone broth. Recently there has been a lot of talk about the health benefits of bone broth, and for a good reason. Bone broth helps with inflammation, infections, and healthy digestion. Our favourite benefit of bone broth is that it aids in cancer prevention. Bone broth contains certain amino acids that are essential for a healthy immune system and liver. The bone marrow also produces lipids, which are important for the formation of white blood cells. The same type of lipids that are found in bone borrow are linked to controlling cancer cell growth.  The bone marrow also contains collagen, which will break down into gelatin, which studies have found may prevent cancer growth development as well as support and strengthen the digestive tract. 

Making bone broth is very similar to making chicken soup. The process starts out the same by roasting and simmering the bones in a liquid. The difference is the amount of time it is simmering away. Opposed to the 2-4 hours it normally takes to make chicken stock, making bone broth takes about 24 hours, or until the bones can be crushed between your two fingers. To ensure you are getting all the proper health benefits, it is recommended to use the bones from an organic, hormone-free, free-range raised animal, like all the meat we use here at The Living Kitchen.

Stay tuned and we'll share a bone broth recipe soon!


Resources:
D. (2015, April 07). Chicken Noodle Soup: An Effective Remedy for the Common Cold? Retrieved March 08, 2017, from http://www.dovemed.com/healthy-living/wellness-center/chicken-noodle-soup-effective-remedy-common-cold/

Desaulniers , V., Dr. (2016, November 22). 5 Ways Bone Broth Boosts Your Immune System and Fights Cancer. Retrieved March 10, 2017, from http://beatcancer.org/blog-posts/5-ways-bone-broth-boosts-your-immune-system-and-fights-cancer

Mercola, Dr. (2013, December 16). Bone Broth: One of Your Most Healing Diet Staples. Retrieved March 09, 2017, from http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/12/16/bone-broth-benefits.aspx

Zabinski, J. (2015, October 12). SiOWfa15: Science in Our World: Certainty and Controversy. Retrieved March 10, 2017, from https://sites.psu.edu/siowfa15/2015/10/12/chicken-noodle-soup-the-magic-cure/